Tag Archives: development

Jive Software Announces Management Team Changes

This entry was cross-posted from Meanders: The Dow Brook Blog

Jive Software has just announced that Christopher Morace will become SVP of Business Development. Morace will retain product marketing oversight and responsibility, but step aside from product management duties. He will be replaced as SVP Product Management by Patrick Lin, who is leaving VMware to join Jive.

These changes to the management team are important because they suggest two things:

1. Jive is still moving quickly toward an Initial Public Offering (IPO) and, perhaps, accelerating their pace toward that goal. By creating a new position (SVP of Business Development) and assigning a proven executive team member (Morace) to the post, Jive is signaling that it is making a serious investment in building partner and reseller channels.

Most enterprise software start-ups do not work to build out their channels until they’ve scaled revenue gained through direct sales to a point necessary to successfully make a public offering. By Jive’s own estimates, the direct sales amount necessary to trigger an IPO is $100 Million. Their creation of a new management team role focused on business development is a clear sign that Jive is nearing that IPO trigger revenue target.

2. The hiring of Patrick Lin reflects the increasing importance of cloud delivery to Jive (and all enterprise social software providers) moving forward. Lin, who had been at VMware for just over 6 years, has deep knowledge of infrastructure and application virtualization technologies and practices. His leading-edge experience will help Jive optimize its social business software offerings for private cloud deployment by customers. Lin’s  virtualization management expertise will also guide Jive in any attempt to build a version of the Jive Engagement Platform that can be hosted in a public cloud (Jive already offers and hosts a SaaS version of its platform.)

Lin is a great addition to the Jive team and not only for his virtualization experience. He has served in product management roles at other companies (VERITAS, Invio) prior to his stint at VMware. In addition, has held product marketing (Invio, Intuit) and business development (Katmango, WebTV) roles, which make him a well rounded executive who can contribute to Jive’s success on many terms.

Considered together, the management changes made by Jive today are a strong indicator that the Enterprise Social Software (ESS) market has reached a new level of maturity and that Jive is pushing it forward. The market continues to expand quickly and customer requirements continue to evolve. Other ESS providers should consider initiating or increasing  investments in channel development. They should also realize that cloud deployments of enterprise software will continue to increase and make appropriate changes to virtualize and optimize their offerings.

Today’s announcement makes me wonder if Jive will be ready for an IPO in the first half of 2011, rather than the later dates previously held as conventional wisdom. What do you think?

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Have Software Suppliers Become Too Customer-Focused?

Remember the old dictum that says “the customer is always right”? Guess what, they aren’t.

Many times during my career as a management consultant, I have heard clients articulate their business needs and wants in the form of technical solution requirements. Besides completely ignoring the important intermediary step of stating those needs and wants as business requirements, the technical requirements voiced too often reflect only what the client knows to be possible; they do not imagine new and alternative technical solutions to business challenges. In other words, customers are not always a great source for innovative ideas on software functionality, much less on entirely new products.

I mention this because, lately, I have been hearing so many software vendors saying how focused they are on use cases and requirements voiced by their customers. Platform module and individual application development seems to be highly driven by customer feedback these days. Perhaps too highly.

Please do not misunderstand; software suppliers should consult frequently with customers, absorb their feedback, and develop against their use cases and requirements. However, vendors must also proactively imagine and build new functionality that will help customers overcome real and critical business challenges in ways that that they did not realize were possible.

A few software suppliers are mindful of this need. I recently saw a position opening announcement for a Senior Product Manager at a software provider that listed the following as one of the key qualifications for a successful candidate:

A demonstrated ability to get past what customers say they want and deliver what they really need

WOW! How powerful is that? It would be difficult to say it in a more simple, clear fashion.

The point of this post is to encourage software providers to think beyond stated customer technical requirements. Those are an important part of product planning, but cannot be the sole basis on which current product development and long-term roadmap decisions are made. Think and act like a management consultant; help your customers envision previously unimagined possibilities. That is a sustainable source of product innovation and competitive advantage.

Thought of the Day: February 1, 2010

Web-based consumer software has taught enterprise software developers much in the last few years, most notably how to create applications and environments that are more interactive and transparent. But enterprise software developers are just beginning to learn the most valuable lesson from the public web — the importance of user experience design (UXD).

This new-found knowledge will be applied to externally-facing Web initiatives first, but will eventually become a critical part of internal work support efforts as well. Within an organization, good UXD can boost productivity, reduce business process cycle time, and improve employee satisfaction — all highly sought-after goals.

A major upshot of the new focus on UXD will likely be the consolidation of currently distinct software categories — Enterprise Portal, Web Content Management, Digital Asset Management, and Collaboration, among others — into a single category and tool set that supports the design of user experiences. This merging of functionality is already occurring and should accelerate in the next year or two.