Gilbane 2008 Boston Observations

gilbane-conference-boston-08

I had the pleasure of attending the Gilbane 2008 Conference in Boston this week. It was the first conference that I’ve participating in for quite some time, and I was strongly reminded of a salient reality of such events:

Conference attendees from end user organizations (not analysts, consultants, or vendors) are there because they seriously need guidance.

The Gilbane conference was advertised as being focused on the intersection of Enterprise Content Management (ECM) and Web/Enterprise 2.0. In reality, discussion of social software and social media nearly drowned out any talk about ECM. Many of the attendees had sound knowledge of, and experience with, ECM tools, but knew very little about social software and media. They were starved for education and strategic guidance. The conference provided some education, but more is needed, and there is a huge opportunity to help organizations figure out why and how they should be using social software and media.

Here are some other key observations I took away from the conference, in no particular order:

  • Most people don’t realize that they are users of social software nearly every day and express the opposite
  • The word “Twitter” is on nearly everyone’s lips, but most don’t understand the unique value produced by microstreaming
  • Social software and media vendors have sewn an incredible amount of confusion in the market, which will ultimately inhibit their success
  • A large majority of end user organizations don’t understand how social software and media can be used to support business strategy
  • Without a defined strategic purpose for using social software and media, most organizations don’t know which tools to use and why
  • Many organizations have not differentiated between internal and external use cases when developing collaboration strategy
  • Most attendees were very concerned about how to demonstrate ROI on social software and media, because it is an increasingly important checkpoint in these awful economic times

The implication of these observations should excite any analyst or consultant operating in the collaboration and KM arena — the current potential opportunity to assist end user organizations is HUGE! On the flip side, if you are involved in introducing social software or media to your organization and are feeling lost at sea, you’re not alone.

There are people out there who are beginning to understand the strategic use of these emergent tools, but they need to develop clear conceptual frameworks, adoption and use data, and strategic guidance so they can better assist the mainstream business world.

Social software and media are early in their life cycle. It’s up to all of us that are involved with it now to advance the market toward, and past, the tipping point. Onward, ho!

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